Of Being Me

becoming the muse beaton

Hello my name is Beaton but by now you should know to call me just B. no other letters, and you don’t pronounce the just. Sometimes I like to tell people that my name is pronounced, you know how in French some letters are silent like the  S in Paris is silent, well all the letters in my name are silent too except for the B……

B.jpg

I am ~B and this is day three of my blog everyday challenge

People are funny creatures, you tell someone to call you B. and next time they call you, they presume to know your name. I have been called Brighton, Brilliant, Beacon, even Brian. I mean Brian? How even? But if there is anything that grinds my gears more than my name being assumed wrong, it’s when I tell someone my name and they pronounce it badly, even when I repeat it…. And I eventually say please just call me B (and save me the drama of hearing my name being mangled) but that other part stays in my head…

Where I come from people tend to give babies names with meaning but I guess most people do to a fashion, like Tawanda (meaning we are many) Tafara (meaning we are happy) Shuvai (meaning Hope) Navelani (also meaning Hope). Most names used here, when you hear them, you understand them, you can define them, you can even find them in the dictionary.

My name is uncommon, I have only “met” one person with it, as a first name, we are Facebook friends… if you are reading this post Hi Beaton!!!!

Beaton
Beaton

When I am asked what my name means sometimes I say, “I cannot be defined because my name is not in the dictionary.” But that’s not completely true I looked up my name it means:

“From the warrior’s estate”

From the warrior’s estate wow… do not mess with me. You see, I am a descendant from a line of warriors that leads back to Shaka The Zulu. Shaka reigned in Southern Africa and consolidated a formidable empire in the late 1700s to early 1800s.

Shaka The Zulu

I don’t think my parents had this in mind when they named me, it was in honour to an uncle….  (hmmmm maybe my grandaparents when they named my uncle….)

In Zimbabwe family kin identify each other by their totems, people of the same clan have the same totem (known as mutupo in Shona language) It’s a patron or spirit animal for your people, you respect it and you are not supposed to eat it. When you have done good, when someone is thanking you or beseeching you or down right flattering you, they can invoke your totem in a clan praise name…….

My mother’s totem is heart (moyo). My father’s totem is fire (moto, mlilo)

My totem is Fire. You become your father’s people…..

 

Again this is uncommon as most, if not all have animals or organic totems. Lion (shumba, murambwi), elephant(zhou ndlovu), monkey(shoko), zebra(dube) heart(moyo) and many other totems. The people who came up with this totem thing were clever not to pick animals like chicken, cow or pig because folk would have been in trouble. Eating your totem is said to cause a host of misfortune including droughts until you appease your ancestors.

My Totem is fire…..

There is nothing I don’t eat, my ancestors “discovered” fire and I pay homage to them in a barbecue.

fire BBQ

Hello my name is Beaton and my spirit animal will barbecue your spirit animal…..

My totem is fire and I was born to be uncommon.

Mlilo, Chauke

~B

PS You can read about my how my ancestors “discovered” fire HERE

 

Shaka Zulu Image credit Source

27 Comments

  1. But wait… My first name is “B”ryan! 🙂 Great post, Beaton! My wife and I used a very uncommon name for one of our sons. His name is “Fade”. I have never heard of anyone else using that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Bryan!!!!!
      with a Y lol do you tell that to people or you let them wallow in their negligence?

      One day your son will have serious questions for you, hope you have a great story to tell… I think one must have a great story to tell….
      ~B

      Like

    1. Hi Tara!!
      Always a pleasure having you around♥♥♥
      I am HOT stuff hahahaha

      ~B

      PS the ~ is for aesthetics you dont pronounce it hahahahahaha I love the way it looks…….

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I like how your post looks like it is written on a chalkboard! And you must be an interesting person to talk to face-to-face. You have such an interesting background let alone name! Nice to meet you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you ♥♥♥
      I loved the theme on first site, it appealed to my story telling nature…. stories are more than just that they are lessons there if you look
      Glad you dropped by^_^

      ~B
      PS Oh I am so much more than sun parts of my name and background…♥♥♥♥

      Like

  3. Hey nice one B, I love that you take pride in knowing thyself… nice to know I’m in good company… I’m sure I’ve told you before that I’m of the Fire spirit element too (Fire Dragon) to be precise… so if ever there is an unholy war… Holla 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hot stuff. Your totem is rather fascinating. I’m sure your ancestors would be most upset and punish you if you did not barbecue every chance you got.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. hey Mable….
      I am glad we dont have those food outlets where you order is written down and they call for you by name……
      I would have high blood pressure
      ~B

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Because of your concern about people saying your name wrong, I read with the goal of learning how to say it correctly but nowhere does the blog explain. I now realize it’s pointless for I am unlikely to run into you so it is not a practical goal. I also realize the concern is probably more about people forgetting what comes after the B rather than accent and emphasis of the letters.

    At first I laughed at how men are always envisioned as warriors or beasts “From the warrior’s estate”. A voice in my head pointed something out, an estate includes a wide range of entities and in my field of finance it is a possession. B the possession of a warrior.

    I don’t understand the Clans in Zimbabwe. My brain malfunctioned when you linked your lineage to Shaka Zulu. I imagined you must be Ndebele but the rituals we discussed sounded Shona. I was confused for I thought the Show have many warriors pre-dating the birth of Shaka in 1787.

    I am interested in historical narratives for its strange for me that I am a clan called Barolong. Rolong (1270-1355) was a chief who took his followers from Guruusa district in Zimbabwe to South Africa during his rule. Barolong moved about a few times as a group due to the Ndebele invasion along Molopo river and again due to the Dutch moving inland from the Cape. Like why should we be tied to this dude specifically, why not his dad or his son Tshidi or the ninth rule before or after him. It amuses me when people are proud to be Zulu who is born a few years ago in the grande scheme of timelines. But then again, who will tell us about the rest of the warriors because oral history died with laws forging sons to work in mines thereby no longer reciting their lineage to their kids.

    Which brings me to your fire totem blog. It reads like Indaba, my children the legends of Africa by Credo Mutwa. It’s funny too like your story of people declared heroes just for returning alive without saving anyone.

    Maybe I’m just jealous that my tribe/clan does not use words warrior for the chiefs were supposed to humble themselves and treat commoners as more important than themselves. Hence the Botswana chiefs never signed letters all by themselves, they would start with,

    I chief of the x tribe Khama together with my brothers, uncles, advisors, tribesmen.

    Then all 20 brothers and uncles and advisors would sign the letter. It was frowned upon to see oneself as above any other in esteem no matter how high in the Royal kingdom.

    Apologies for the long comment.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love long detailed comments, they help put things into perspective ^_^
      I wanted to add a voice note to this post with how one pronounces my name but at the time of the post creation I had not yet figured out how to embed audio to posts anyhow you pronounce it as it like you would read this sentence “watching the sun shine a beat on me” lol at the being a possession I prefer the less possessive definition of estate ha!

      I completely agree with you on how there’s gaps in our knowledge or narrations of history, at the back of my mind there’s always this niggling thought best expressed in a quote I have seen around about how “until the lion learns to write, history will be told by the hunter”
      My mother is Shona which might explain the Shona rituals, I am not Ndebele though I can understand how it would seem to point to that.

      After that recent spat of violence in SA I bet if everybody properly understood their origin stories I bet some people would be feeling darn foolish about xenophobia finding out we all immigrants in the greater scheme of things and yet they stay fixated on the last few years of the grand scheme
      I have another post you might find of interest in explaining my ancestry https://wp.me/p3NqTj-69

      someone once pointed out that I seem to have a post for everything^_^
      ~B

      Like

      1. True. “Lion-hunter”.

        I see. “Sunshine”

        Oh yes definitely. “Xenophobia”. But I understand what I desire will not happen in my lifetime. Hence I daydream of starting a slightly different idea of boy/girl scouts. One where the kids learn about the lineage of African languages which automatically will show them no nation is truly defined by borders which became necessary in times of inspiration to be conquerors. I blame the Greeks. My boyfriend is Greek and has explained that primary school history makes the kids memorize the Greek empires (Byzantine, Mycenaean) which later if the kids think beyond the rulers they realize that Greeks called themselves conquerors while actually they became losers of their culture as the conquered would not let go of their pagan religions and languages and culture which the masters eventually adopted. Just as Dutch eventually transformed to Afrikaans when slaves spoke their Asiatic languages combined with African indigenous languages. Just merely learning languages the kids could realize we are no islands. The era of conquests and wars has been quiet long enough to consider flattening borders. But no way that the African politicians would allow that kind of loss of power.

        Jeez I can go on and on about how to force man to truly see what they think they should be proud of is all disguised as the other side of discrimination. Eg. I am wealthy. I am educated. I am Christian. I am a man. I am South African. Each statement has someone on the other side.

        Like

  6. What’s in a name. I don’t believe or follow these but someone showed me this site and it amused me

    Your name of Beaton makes you extremely generous.

    You have a bubbling, spontaneous nature and a happy-go-lucky outlook which helps smooth the pathway of life.

    Also you are sympathetic to the needs of others.

    Interested in art, music, singing, dancing, and anything of an artistic nature, you could become a very fine performer.

    Your spontaneous expression stands you in good stead during arguments or debates, though you are perhaps too outspoken and inclined to sarcasm.

    A very real weakness of this name is lack of system and order.

    The use of this name makes it extremely difficult to carry through and finish the things you start.

    It is easy to make promises in an effort to make others happy, although not so easy to keep them.

    You spend your money recklessly, seldom reckoning whether you can afford to be so generous.
    Health Analysis

    The use of this name can cause weak ankles, a strong desire for such foods as sweets or pickles, which causes skin or liver troubles, and a desire to eat too quickly.

    Like

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